Healing the Vicious Cycle of Addiction: A Dharmic Way to Interrupt the Cycle

About This Event

Addiction, compulsion, dependence, obsession, craving, infatuation—whatever you want to call it, you know it when you’re in it. Thoughts can be addicting, just like eating, drinking, shopping, or gambling, a fact the Buddha understood well. Luckily (or unluckily, depending on how you look at it), people haven’t changed much in 2,500 years. The teachings of the eightfold path are still useful, dependable lessons, available to help the ordinary person step out of the cycle of samsara and addiction. In this retreat, Vimalasara (Valerie Mason-John), chair of the Triratna Vancouver Buddhist Centre, will illuminate how the Buddhist teachings can relieve you of your own addictions. Through guided meditations, liturgy and other forms of Buddhist practice, Vimalasara will uncover the sources of our craving and how to address this suffering to break the habitual patterns of addiction and the suffering caused by addiction.

 

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Welcome to Zen Mountain Monastery. Before you register for a retreat, please take a thorough look at our website so that you familiarize yourself with what it's like to do a retreat with us.

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We asked people why they go on retreat, here's what they said:

To continue down this amazing path I am on ! Linsey
 

Retreat Guru's Vision

We believe human beings are innately wise, strong and kind. This wisdom, although not always experienced, is always present. Going on retreat is a beautiful way to reconnect to our basic sanity and health. Our aspiration at Retreat Guru is to inspire people to experience authentic retreats and reconnect with their innate wisdom, strength and kindness.

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